facts

Facts and Figures: Venomous Animal Tree

The following tree gives a rough idea of the relationships between animal groups, particularly those which have venomous species. It is not a comprehensive list of groups, as that would be very large. Rather, the major and more well-known groups are shown. Venomous animals (only those which are regarded as dangerously venomous to humans) are shown in red. Following a link will take you to more information on that group.

Facts and Figures: World's Most Venomous Snakes

Which snake species is the most venomous depends on the measure used. The average or the maximum venom yield from milking could be suggested, but these measures can be criticised as not reflecting the impact of a real bite. The measure generally acknowledged as best reflecting how dangerous a snake's venom is is that of LD50. The lower this number, the less venom is required to cause death. By that measure, the most venomous snake in the world is Australia's inland taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus).

Facts and Figures: Map of Venomous Snakes

The following map is intended as a rough guide only. Moving the cursor over the area of interest will give a brief list of which venomous snakes are to be found in that area.

Facts and Figures: Map of Venomous Snakes

The following map is intended as a rough guide only. Moving the cursor over the area of interest will give a brief list of which venomous snakes are to be found in that area.

Facts and Figures

Here you will find a collection of interesting material generally concerned with venomous animals of Australia and their impact on humans.

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